I’m Not Breaking Down, I’m Breaking Out: Why sensory overload isn’t linear

Abled people tend to think of disability as rigid and unchanging, but autism can appear to fluctuate - a LOT. One day a few weeks ago I ended up going from London Bridge to Moorgate *via Farringdon* because I couldn't cope with the idea of a four-minute tube journey; a few days later, I spent … Continue reading I’m Not Breaking Down, I’m Breaking Out: Why sensory overload isn’t linear

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Quick thoughts: Greta Thunberg and (really, really obvious) ableism

(Totally got halfway through this only for my browser to crash, so this is now officially a rushed job on the morning Tube commute. Bear with me...) Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist, has just set sail for New York to spend some time in the Americas for speeches, summits and generally being super … Continue reading Quick thoughts: Greta Thunberg and (really, really obvious) ableism

How I Write Essentially The Same Heatwave Blog Over And Over

1) Everyone's talking about the same thing, but because you're me and you insist that for you somehow different and more, you need to make your blog stand out. You need an angle, an extra point to make. The easiest is the complicated links between autistic sensory reactivity and anxiety. It's a topic you're genuinely … Continue reading How I Write Essentially The Same Heatwave Blog Over And Over

Sensory differences, self-care and one big Saturday

The autistic spectrum is so often considered in binary terms. If you find some things difficult, you’re assumed to have no strengths; if you can do some things well (often including “typing out a tweet”), you’re assumed to have no difficulties. If you’re proud to be neurodivergent, you’re assumed not to recognise the disabling aspects. … Continue reading Sensory differences, self-care and one big Saturday